Bike MS training update: Self-inflicted drama

This past Saturday, June 1st, I rode the 9th annual Atlas Ride, which is the kickoff ride for the Texas 4000 ride from Austin to Anchorage. The Texas 4000 is the longest charity ride in the world. This year 69 University of Texas students will pedal 4,000 miles in 70 days from Austin to Anchorage following one of three routes – through the Rockies, the Ozarks, or the Sierras. The Ozarks route is new for 2013. The team’s mission is to fundraise, educate and bring hope to those with cancer. It seems like an experience of a lifetime and I’m always impressed by these dedicated young adults. This was my third year riding.

Don’t forget, I’m only two training weekends away from the Bike MS event Ride the Rim that I will participate in out in Canyon, TX on June 22nd. The ride is a 105 mile loop around the Palo Duro Canyon and I can’t wait to finally get to see that part of Texas. This is my 6th Bike MS event. I choose to fundraise for these events in honor of the many people in my life that I know that have been affected by Multiple Sclerosis. Please consider making a donation to the MS Society in support of my participation and to help the MS Society support those living with MS as well as fund valuable research so that someday (soon I hope) a cure is found.

The Drama

As you probably guessed, I caused myself some relatively mild problems in the grand scheme of things this past weekend. The issue is that I couldn’t just have a single problem, apparently they have to come in sets of three. And to top it all off, my husband was out of town. Since the Atlas ride is a one way ride from Cedar Park to Lampasas, he would normally meet me at the winery where the ride ends and drive me home (awesome, right?). This year I made alternate plans to ride the bus back to Cedar Park and send my bike in the truck donated by UPS. I was nervous about the treatment my bike might receive, so I purchased some foam pipe insulation to protect my bike frame, cut it to size, and packed it in my bag to be transported to Lampasas. So far, so good.

And then it’s Saturday morning. I head out to Cedar Park and get all my stuff ready for my ride. In the course of mounting my GoPro camera to my handlebars, I manage to drop the nut that attaches the camera to the tripod mount. The nice people next to my car help me find it. I get it put back where it belongs and try to tighten the screw. It will not tighten when the camera is in proper position. I later learn that the thumb screw somehow became tilted and is now useless. I can’t take my camera with me on one of the prettiest rides of the season. Strike #1. I’ll just have to take a handful of pictures with my camera. I head out on the ride.

At the start, ready to go. First the current Texas 4000 team rode out. Then alumni from previous years. Finally, the rest of us.

At the start, ready to go. First the current Texas 4000 team rode out. Then alumni from previous years. Finally, the rest of us.

The landscape really is gorgeous. The majority of the route heads north west with some tail wind. There’s a section on the 70 mile route that I was on that turns south east and hits a head wind. I don’t time my rest stops well and almost run out of water before making it to the next stop. The volunteers are super nice and so are the Texas 4000 riders. Twistleaf Yuccas are in bloom EVERYWHERE and they are lovely. I want one for my yard.

Imagine these plants in all of the fields. It was awesome. Image found on davesgarden.com

The rest stop I was anxiously waiting for was in Burnet. Probably one of the best rest stops I’ve seen on a charity ride – it was at a school stadium, had real restrooms, frozen fruit smoothies, watermelon and lots of other delicious snacks. I parked my bike against the fence like everyone else while I was hanging out and cooling down a bit from the hot ride. I start walking towards my bike. I hear a crash. MY BIKE BLEW OVER IN THE WIND! No one else’s bike did. Apparently it’s just that light. The pedal, brake lever, and shifter are nicked up. I am angry at the wind. Strike #2.

Pulling out of the rest stop, we’ve got the tailwind back thankfully. I’m making record time despite the head wind on the one section. Close to the end, I start to see people riding the 25 mile out and back route that leaves from the winery. I see one young woman followed by her silver-haired father who can’t stop grinning. He reminds me of my dad. In what feels like no time at all, I pull in at the Texas Legato Winery after completing my 70 mile ride averaging 17.8 mph.

The finish line!

The finish line!

I hang out in the tents and shove a baked potato into my mouth. I’m not usually excited about baked potatoes but this one with barbeque sauce, onion and cheese is delicious. Probably the 3,400 calories I burned made all food amazing at that point. I sign up for my bus ride, get the foam tubes installed on my bike frame and the bike loaded into the truck, find the place where you buy frozen “wine-a-ritas” and head to the bus to go home. It’s a school bus.

Two Texas 4000 riders congratulate each other at the finish.

Two Texas 4000 riders congratulate each other at the finish.

The tent. It has the food.

The tent. It has the food.

Bikes everywhere, the school bus and the UPS truck.

Bikes everywhere, the school bus and the UPS truck.

Saying goodbye to the party.

Saying goodbye to the party.

I get on the school bus, the last one in, and find someone nice enough to let me share a little bench seat with them for the next hour. We strike up a conversation and I learn the gentleman’s wife has had MS since 1994. He thanks me for riding Bike MS events. He’s done 12 Bike MS events himself. I thank him for riding. I learn that his wife is in a scooter chair these days. I can’t imagine what life must be like for them, despite my personal connections to the disease.

We make it back to Cedar Park. They’re unloading our bikes. I start rummaging through my bag for a little pouch containing my car key, driver’s license, credit card, cash, etc. I can’t find it. I empty the bag. It’s not there. STRIKE #3.

I go through my options of getting home in my head. Husband is out of town. Friends that are semi-nearby that could help me are out of town or busy that day. I do NOT want to ride home and then ride back. I ask the remaining cyclists if anyone can give me a ride. I get a ride from a gentleman with an old Jeep Wrangler. He puts my bike on the back of the Jeep and I am terrified it will fall off. During the drive I learn he is also a physicist like my husband and many of our friends. I make it home and my bike is still in one piece. Luckily we have a garage door keypad so I can get back in the house.

I call the winery and let them know what I’ve lost. About 30 minutes later they call me back and tell me my pouch was found. Whew! I put together my plan to get my car back. I could ride 17 miles to get it, but I’m tired, hot and there are many hills on that route. Instead I take the Capital MetroRail from my house up to the Lakeline station. From the Lakeline station, I ride 7 miles to my car, load my bike and drive home. The Lakeline station is quite nice if you’ve never been there.

Sunday, I drive the two and a half hour roundtrip to get my pouch from the winery. At least I have good company.

Molly dog is good company for the drive. We stopped and hiked a bit on the Brushy Creek Regional Trail.

Molly dog is good company for the drive. We stopped and hiked a bit on the Brushy Creek Regional Trail.

 

 

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Bike MS training update: Riding the Big Dam(n) Loop

Last weekend was Memorial day. I had plans to ride on Saturday, which were rained out, then to ride on Sunday, and it rained again, so luckily Monday was dry so I could get in my training ride (yay, three day weekend). Because the group ride I had originally planned to participate in was cancelled, I decided to head out on a relatively hilly route that the locals call the Dam Loop because it crosses over the Mansfield Dam. I had to add some miles to the normal loop to bring my total route up to 73 miles for the day. While riding my big dam loop I usually change it to big damn loop in my head. This day was no exception, since it started out windy from the beginning. Check out the photos below for the summary of my ride.

Why do I ride 73 miles on a super windy day? Well, I do love to ride, but right now I’m three training weekends away from the Bike MS event Ride the Rim that I will participate in out in Canyon, TX on June 22nd. The ride is a 105 mile loop around the Palo Duro Canyon and I can’t wait to finally get to see that part of Texas. This is my 6th Bike MS event. I choose to fundraise for these events in honor of the many people in my life that I know that have been affected by Multiple Sclerosis. Please consider making a donation to the MS Society in support of my participation and to help the MS Society support those living with MS as well as fund valuable research so that someday (soon I hope) a cure is found.

First time riding on Lakeline Blvd - It was wide, relatively flat and low traffic early on Memorial day morning. Oh, and a nasty headwind bad enough to make me wonder if I would make the entire ride.

First time riding on Lakeline Blvd – It was wide, relatively flat and had low traffic early on Memorial day morning. Oh, and a nasty headwind bad enough to make me wonder if I would make the entire ride.

See the flag? Windy!

See the flag? Windy!

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Out in the ‘burbs, you see lots of wide boulevards, green grass and signs listing about 20 builders in the area. That’s the sign you see in this picture.

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After making the turn onto 620, I was surprised that it was windy, but not quite as terrible as I thought. The stretch of Lakeline that I pedaled ended up being the worst wind of the day. Here you can see a few food trailers on the right.

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Hippy Hollow! Windy Point! Such great views when you ride 620, I think you basically ride along the ridge that goes along the lake.

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You can almost see the lake on the right. Love the views out here.

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Now you can definitely see our poor, low Lake Travis.

Coming up to Mansfield Dam.

Coming up to Mansfield Dam.

Just about to cross the dam.

Just about to cross the dam.

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A tiny bit of blue sky!

Iguana gill... a tex mex restaurant with decent food and a great view, without the long waits of the Oasis.

Iguana gill… a tex mex restaurant with decent food and a great view, without the long waits of the Oasis.

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This picture is for my Dad – a golf course AND a water tower that looks like a golf ball on a tee!

Lakeway has these signs everywhere. Fancy.

Lakeway has these signs everywhere. Fancy.

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Some little flags on the corner in honor of Memorial Day.

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Bee Caves Parkway connects 620 to 2244 (Bee Caves Rd) and is nice and wide. Wide enough for bike lanes actually, but instead they just put up share the road and bikes may use full lane signs a few places along this short road.

Bee Caves road, recently repaved apparently.

Bee Caves road, recently repaved apparently. It’s a pretty hilly road, but many hills are rollers.

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The on ramp to loop 360.

360 has some great views and the cloud cover gave way to some blue skies.

360 has some great views and the cloud cover gave way to some blue skies.

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I love looking at these small cliffs.

Coming up on the Pennybacker bridge. The approach from the south to this bridge is an awesomely fast downhill.

Coming up on the Pennybacker bridge. The approach from the south to this bridge is an awesomely fast downhill.

 

Crossing the bridge.

Crossing the bridge.

 

The turn off of 360 into the Arboretum is always disheartening after a long ride. That's a nasty little hill to climb!

The turn off of 360 into the Arboretum is always disheartening after a long ride. That’s a nasty little hill to climb!

 

Almost home... riding past Tacodeli is usually torture, but I often come back there for a special lunch treat after making it home.

Almost home… riding past Tacodeli is usually torture, but I often come back there for a special lunch treat after making it home.

Finally crossing Metric into my neighborhood!

Finally crossing Metric into my neighborhood!

 

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Making bread cakes for bike training season

The Feed Zone Cookbook, source of the original recipe

The Feed Zone Cookbook, source of the original recipe

In recent bike training seasons I’ve found that I have to eat relatively simple foods while out on my rides. Power bar style foods haven’t been cutting it. I’ve found some products that I can buy like Thunderbird Energetica bars (cashew fig carrot is my favorite) and Honey Stinger chews that agree with me, but I’ve also been experimenting with making my own portable snacks. I recently picked up the Feed Zone Cookbook to help my experimentation. One recipe called savory bread cakes caught my interest since I have a special place in my heart for bread. I changed the recipe a bit of course, since I decided to omit the bacon.

Savory bacon bread cakes

Savory bread cakes

I halved the recipe to find out if I liked it or not. My recipe:

  • 2 cups cubed rosemary sourdough bread
  • 1 cup skim milk
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/4 cup shredded cheese, cheddar and cotija (I used extra since I skipped the bacon)
  • Salt
  • Brown sugar
Mmmm... rosemary sourdough is delicious and give the bread cakes good flavor

Mmmm… rosemary sourdough is delicious and give the bread cakes good flavor

First, cube the sourdough bread.

First, cube the sourdough bread.

Pour the milk on the bread cubes and let it soak a bit.

Pour the milk on the bread cubes and let it soak a bit.

Whisk up the eggs.

Whisk up the eggs.

Add the eggs, cheese and salt to the bread and mix it up.

Add the eggs, cheese and salt to the bread and mix it up.

After greasing a bread pan, pour in the mixture.

After greasing a bread pan, pour in the mixture. Bake at 350 until firm. About 25 minutes for my batch.

Finished bread cakes.

Finished bread cakes.

Sliced up, ready to eat.

Sliced up, ready to eat.

After baking the bread cake, I let it cool, sliced it into four pieces and wrapped the pieces up in parchment paper and froze them. I ate one during my latest Bike MS training ride, the Real Ale Ride. The bread cake was soft by the time I stopped to eat it, so it definitely could not be eaten while riding, which I would have preferred. However, it was quite tasty. I might go with a bit less cheese next time because there were a few large cheddar chunks that I wasn’t too excited about eating in the heat.

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Bike MS training update: The Real Ale Ride

This past Saturday, at an ungodly early hour, I loaded up my bike and headed out to Blanco for the annual Real Ale Ride that leaves from the Real Ale brewery. The ride motto? “Up the hills, Down the beers.” Definitely fitting. I was hopeful as the ride started that maybe the wind wouldn’t get as bad as promised. And around mile 35, with a tailwind, I climbed a THREE MILE long hill that I hoped was the worst that I would experience. Ha. No such luck. Soon after climbing that hill, we turned again and were greeted with a gusty headwind. There were moments where I questioned my resolve. I even pulled over on the side of the road (not at a rest stop) to have a snack and rest, something I’ve never done on an organized ride. The hills were good training (see the Garmin route here), I suppose, for the Bike MS event Ride the Rim that I will participate in out in Canyon, TX on June 22nd. There is a very very nasty hill on that ride. In support of the fact that I will not SAG up that hill, please consider making a donation to the MS Society in support of my participation! (SAG = support vehicle that I could choose to ride in)

The good news is that I finished after 65 miles in one piece and got to enjoy lunch, beer, music and italian ice. By that time of day, it was downright hot and the humidity was still ridiculous so the italian ice from Rita’s was a special treat. The other fun part? I won a contest to be a “Beerbassador” sponsored by Real Ale and Bicycle Sport Shop. I got a free Real Ale Phoenix jersey, entry into the Real Ale Ride, a cool bottle opener and a very heavy case of Fireman’s 4.

Warning: this post has many pictures because I got yet another handlebar mount for my GoPro. This one is supposed to swivel but once I tightened the set screw, I couldn’t loosen it, so I couldn’t swivel the camera on my bike. Sigh.

Do you see me in the crowd of beerbassadors?

Classic cars, rolling down the main street in Blanco right after the ride started.

Classic cars, rolling down the main street in Blanco right after the ride started.

Classic cars, rolling down the main street in Blanco right after the ride started.

Classic cars, rolling down the main street in Blanco right after the ride started.

The day started out extremely humid and very hazy.

The day started out extremely humid and very hazy.

The haze slowly started to clear.

The haze slowly started to clear.

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Lots of wildflowers on the left side of the road.

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It’s hard to tell here, but you can see hills off in the distance.

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Pretty clouds and a great view.

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Small cliffs along the side of the road.

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Rolling into a small town, where the first rest stop I stopped at was located.

First rest stop! At a cute little general store type building.

First rest stop! At a cute little general store type building.

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Hills in the distance and the haze was back.

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This picture is for my father-in-law. There’s an old thresher on the left side of the road. Can you see it?

Tandem riders. Maybe I'll have one of those someday. I'll have to be the front rider through.

Tandem riders. Maybe I’ll have one of those someday. I’ll have to be the front rider through.

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Hills…

Wildflowers!

Wildflowers!

The second rest stop I paused at had a table with a high school boy serving Rita's italian ice. I think it's the only reason I got back on my bike to fight the headwind to the finish.

The second rest stop I paused at had a table with a high school boy serving Rita’s italian ice. I think it’s the only reason I got back on my bike to fight the headwind to the finish.

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The Blanco river is on the right side of the road. It’s hard to see here.

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That blue sign says “Ride your bike hard today” from Clif bar. Don’t worry, I did.

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When I first pulled up to the finish the food line was SO long. Luckily it moved pretty quickly.

The finish party had a band, dancers, food and beer. Plenty of tents to sit in the shade too.

The finish party had a band, dancers, food and beer. Plenty of tents to sit in the shade too.

After making it home with my prize, Mojo   was king of the Fireman's 4 beer mountain.

After making it home with my prize, Mojo was king of the Fireman’s 4 beer mountain.

Thanks for reading! Please consider a donation to my Bike MS fundraising!

 

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Bike training update – Red Poppy Ride

While I took last weekend off from training, the previous weekend on April 27th I continued training for Bike MS: Ride the Rim by riding 50 miles in the Red Poppy Ride in Georgetown. If you’re able, please consider making a donation to the MS Society in support of my participation.

It was my first ride on my brand new bike, a custom built titanium road bike. The frame was built by Independent Fabrication and the bike and components were assembled by Bicycle Sport Shop. It is an amazing ride and I can’t wait to ride it again this weekend.

Unfortunately, none of the mounts that I’ve been trying out with my GoPro Hero have worked out so far, so I have only a few pictures from the ride.

Here she is, my new bike right after picking her up.

Here she is, my new bike right after picking her up. The colors go from “Tahitian pearl” in the front to a dark gray metallic in the back. The seat and chain stays are raw titanium. The hubs and rings on the head tube are mango, giving it an interesting color contrast. 

Awesome head badge

Awesome head badge

 

The start of the Red Poppy Ride. It started as a gray day.

The start of the Red Poppy Ride. It started as a gray day.

 

The rest stops were full of awesome volunteers. At one stop, the volunteers all had hats with red poppies on them. Sadly, I did not stop and get their picture :(

The rest stops were full of awesome volunteers. At one stop, the volunteers all had hats with red poppies on them. Sadly, I did not stop and get their picture 😦 Although the woman on the left in this picture seems to have red poppies on her shirt!

A kind volunteer held my bike while I was stopped at the rest stop.

A kind volunteer held my bike while I was stopped at the rest stop.

The only red poppies I saw on this ride were way up by someone’s house, so here are some others to look at:

Because I didn’t find any red poppies myself, here’s a pretty picture from flickr of some red poppies in Georgetown

Image credit: 50%ChanceofRain

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Bike MS Training Update #9: Riding from Texas to Iowa

That’s right, I rode to Iowa. Ok, I rode in a car from Texas to Iowa, but I did take my bike with me. My husband and I traveled up there to his family’s farm to celebrate his parent’s 40th wedding anniversary. The farm is just outside of Northwood, Iowa, a few miles south of the Minnesota border. While not all of Iowa is flat, north central Iowa is so I was excited to pack up my bike into the trunk of our car to take along with us. The event that I’m training for is only four weeks away so being able to continue my training during our trip was great. My training is for the 2012 Bike MS: Pedal to the Point in northern Ohio. It’s a 175 mile bike ride over two days.  If you’re able, please consider supporting my participation by making a donation to the MS Society. This is my 5th year bike riding to raise money for the MS Society. I’ve seen too many friends and family affected by the disease.

Before making the trip, I planned for my rides by requesting an Iowa bike map from the department of transportation. It was super helpful and up to date. It also arrived the day before we left. I used that map to chart out my routes along the very grid-like roads. The map was also key because on Google maps I couldn’t necessarily tell which roads were gravel and which were paved. There are many gravel roads in Iowa. My route on Friday ended up being a 75 mile loop. I planned to ride east and south at the beginning because the wind was forecasted out of the south / south east. Last week was amazingly hot for Iowa, hitting 100 degrees or more so it was basically the same weather I cope with in Texas. Friday morning I set out at 7 am and headed east of Northwood.

Setting out in the morning towards the sun on a flat road.

The first half of my ride consisted of my staring in wonder at all of the windmills. I’ve seen plenty of windmills in west Texas, but never from a bike and so close to me. The wind wasn’t too strong and about half of the windmills weren’t spinning. My assumption is that the grid didn’t need or couldn’t handle the power at that time, so some of the windmills were turned off. In Texas, the windmills typically go as far as you can see in places. In Iowa, they were more contained. I assume that individual small farms have installed the windmills while in Texas, they are installed on the HUGE ranches that stretch for many miles.

Windmills on both sides of the road.

A common site: a corn field, farm buildings, and windmills.

This small Iowa river is bigger than any river I see in Texas.

Around mile 48, I stopped in the small town of St. Ansgar to refill my water bottles and to enjoy a few minutes off of the bike while eating a granola bar. I sat on a bench located along the main street and took a few pictures.

Small town hardware store

Buildings in the main part of town. The red one is from 1891!

During the ride, I missed two turns due to unmarked roads. Luckily I was able to use the Iowa biking map to correct my mistakes before too long. Because not many roads were paved it was pretty easy to figure out that if it was paved, it was my turn.

Confusing sign on the road I was supposed to turn on but was unmarked. Made me think it was a dead end!

My second stop for water and a banana was a tiny market in Grafton, IA. I knew I wanted to ride through Grafton because my Mom lives in Grafton, Ohio!

Look Ma, I’m in Grafton!

Grafton also had some old buildings. The market shared the same space as the post office.

It was lucky that Grafton had a market, which I didn’t know in advance, because I managed not to pack enough food for the ride. Grafton was around mile 55 of the route. I finished my ride at 12:15. The last hour and a half was just plain hot but I still enjoyed every minute of it.

 

On Saturday morning, I was able to get out for a short 35 mile ride. The weather had cooled considerably and brought with it a stronger wind out of the north. When I left, I had some concern that it might rain.

The first thing I did was turn north into the wind on a road that I thought would take me into Minnesota. It took me right to the border and turned to gravel.

See, I rode to Minnesota! And then turned around.

I then turned south and completed a loop back to the farm. I passed the local grass airstrip where tiny planes take off, I imagine to spread water or chemicals on fields. The clouds are rather ominous in this picture, but they had all burned away by the time I finished my ride. It was a perfect way to start the day of the party.

The grassy runway

 

Riding in Iowa was better than I had even imagined. It was mostly flat except for long, low hills, the roads were amazingly well kept, and the drivers were very courteous. Not only did they move all the way over into the left lane to pass me, but many even gave a friendly wave. The waves from Texas drivers tend to be the unfriendly kind.  I wouldn’t hesitate to ride there again.

Bike MS training update #4: These people are riding to Anchorage!

This past weekend was a great weekend for bike training. Saturday I rode the Atlas ride which is the kickoff ride for the Texas 4000 riders. The Texas 4000 riders are UT students that ride from Austin, Texas to Anchorage Alaska over a 70 day period and more than 4,500 miles. They spread hope, knowledge, and charity while raising funds to fight cancer. It’s a once in a lifetime experience, no rider can ride more than once. I know, I’m jealous too. Day one goes from Cedar Park to Lampasas on either a 53 or 70 mile route. This year, I rode the 53 mile route. The day was gorgeous and the route was generous – it went mostly north with decent wind out of the south and seemed to be more downhill than up. My average speed was quite speedy and I finished nice in early, in time to go back to Austin for a brewery open house.

At the start line, the supply trailer waiting to pull out after the riders.

Texas 4000 riders waiting to start

Tiny little church in Joppa, across from a rest stop.

In early at the finish line, barely no one in the tent

Bike racks waiting for the riders to roll in at the finish

 

On Sunday it was pretty windy, with wind out of the south again. I stayed on a mostly sheltered route through town for about 21 miles. The sunflowers are gorgeous this time of year.

I call this one sunflowers and railroad tracks

 

Thanks for reading and remember –  I’m training for the 2012 Pedal to the Point Bike MS ride in northern Ohio. Consider supporting my participation by making a donation today!

 

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Bike MS Training update #3

Well, I’m a little behind on this update, but I did get out on my bike last weekend. Luckily, it was a rather boring bike weekend so I don’t have a lot to say.

Saturday it was windy of course, so I rode in a bunch of random directions for 42 miles. I stopped along loop 360 to take some photos because it’s peach season and some tents were set up along the side of the road.

The wildflowers are still in bloom, giving me a great view:

 

Sunday was a pretty laid back day, also windy, so I just cruised the neighborhood for 20 miles.

I’m training for the 2012 Pedal to the Point Bike MS ride in northern Ohio. Consider supporting my participation by making a donation today!

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Bike MS training update #2

This past week was a great week for bike riding in Austin. I was able to get out on a few weekdays, including a ride to work on Friday for ride your bike to work day. Unfortunately my route did not take me by any free breakfast stations that were offered. Not that riding to work is out of the ordinary for me, I typically make the 11 mile round trip commute by bike 2 – 3 times per week.

On Saturday, May 19th I started my ride bright and early at 8 am, hoping to avoid any wind that might pick up. I cruised north on Parmer Lane for 21 miles before making a u-turn and heading home. The day was quite beautiful:

By the time I hit the u-turn the wind was in full force however, making it a little more difficult to enjoy the ride. Stopped at the used car dealership that sets out water containers for cyclists to get a picture of the flags flapping furiously in the wind.

My total ride distance was 42 miles.

On Sunday, May 20th I set out on a shorter ride in the afternoon. Oh, and without wind to annoy me. On shorter rides I sometimes just take a tour of neighborhoods near my home. Saw this house off Duval that had great metal yard art scattered throughout the front and back yards and some nice native plants out front.

Total distance for this ride was 21 miles.

I’m training for the 2012 Pedal to the Point Bike MS ride in northern Ohio. Consider supporting my participation by making a donation today!

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