2016 Bike MS: The Road Divided – ride recap

Well, the big day finally arrived! Last Friday we packed up all my bike stuff, and our dog, into our car and drove straight north on I-35 until we hit Norman, OK (just south of Oklahoma City). Thanks to almost 40 donors and a generous matching donation from my employer, I raised $2,900 for the MS Society! And, it’s not too late to donate if you’re interested. I really can’t thank everyone enough, many who have donated each of the 9 years that I’ve fundraising for the MS Society.

During our drive, we stopped in Fort Worth for lunch with a friend and then in Norman to see a cousin’s new baby. The weather forecast for Sunday was showing a strong chance of thunderstorms, so the ride organizer made the decision Friday afternoon to proactively cancel Sunday for safety reasons. It was quite disappointing, even more so when it didn’t rain at all on Sunday on the route. At least we got rained on during the drive back to Austin.

I rode 100.5 miles on Saturday, the first 70 miles were mostly north, so the strong wind out of the south was incredibly helpful. The 100 mile route went very close to the finish line in Guthrie, and then out northwest to a small town called Crescent. The portion of the ride that went out to Crescent and back was quite difficult… so crossing the finish line was quite the relief.

And now, for the barrage of photos:

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Waiting for the start, wearing last year’s top fundraiser jersey from the Bike MS Arkansas ride

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A view of the start – including the crazy blue bike thing…

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Riding through the Oklahoma University campus

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Oklahoma University castle type building

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Small church on campus

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Sun rising over the cemetery

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Long straight roads

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Some sheep along the side of the road… in a more developed area than you might expect

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We rode next to Tinker Air Force base, which was surrounded by defense contractors like Boeing, Lockheed, and Northrop Grumman

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One of the entrances to the Air Force Base

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Arriving the “lunch” rest stop at mile 44, meeting Carl and Molly

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The rest stop was at a camp building

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There were inspirational signs placed along the route

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Bike path!

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About to cross highways and the Oklahoma River, which is a US Olympics training area

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Oklahoma River

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OKC skyline

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People marching for an unknown (to me) cause, wearing purple shirts

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Old house in downtown

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Another old house

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Approaching the Capitol building with an oil derrick in front of it

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Better view of the oil derrick

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Capitol building

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I saw SO MANY CHURCHES. It put Austin’s church density to shame. In one stretch of road about a mile long, I passed 7 churches!

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Nice smooth road – a welcome change from the mostly bumpy Oklahoma roads

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A little amusement park, gearing up for Halloween – you can sort of see the giant spider on the side of the roller coaster

 

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The views on the roads north of OKC were some of the nicest on the ride

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Pleasant Hill cemetery (with a backwards ‘N’?)

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Old stone house out in the country

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Entering “Historic Guthrie” – this was about 10 miles before I hit the actual downtown area

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Cows

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Second rest stop at mile 70 – just on the outskirts of Guthrie, and right before I started the hardest part of my ride. I was the first rider to hit this rest stop!

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From the rest stop in Guthrie I headed northwest, first crossing the Cimarron river which reminded me of the color of cinnamon

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See? Kinda reddish

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Looking the other direction

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A haunted house on the outskirts of town

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The dirt out here was really red

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Lots of inspirational signs on the 100 mile route

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Horses

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Out towards Crescent, the clouds were really ominous

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But luckily the storm stayed to the west

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I basically alternated between riding straight north and then straight west

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Very red dirt, very dark clouds

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I paused briefly at the rest stop in Crescent and talked to the friendly volunteers

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They had lined the road with signs

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Crescent is not very big…

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I came across these squiggly lines painted on the road from time to time, but have no idea what they mean

 

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Small town cemetery

 

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Red cliffs

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Where’s a good tailwind when you need it? Especially appropriate at this point since I was riding against a pretty heavy headwind for the last 15 miles.

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Back in Guthrie I got to take photos of some old buildings

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Including this bike shop which had a penny farthing out front!

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Downtown Guthrie

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The Oklahoma Territorial Museum

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Getting so close to the finish!

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The Scottish Rite Masonic Temple

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The finish line finally in sight

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If you look closely you can see Carl and Molly behind the guy in the green shirt

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100.5 miles!

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Crossing the finish

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Posing with my favorite dog

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Bike MS Training Sept 10 & 11: Riding out to the breweries

ONLY ONE MORE TRAINING WEEKEND LEFT! This is my 9th year riding in a Bike MS event and in just over a week and a half I’ll be riding 160 miles over two days at Bike MS: The Road Divided in Oklahoma. I fundraise because I believe that MS can be cured in my lifetime and I’ve known too many people affected by this disease. Will you join me in the fight against MS? I’m almost 50% to my fundraising goal and I would be honored by your support!

This past weekend I got to do another destination ride, where I left from my house and ended up at a place that serves alcohol. This time, I rode 80 miles to Jester King brewery and Last Stand brewing on Saturday where my husband met me with lunch. Jester King had a beer release we wanted to try, and Last Stand was hosting an Oktoberfest party. On Sunday, I rode 42 miles closer to home.

Saturday’s ride started off pretty cool for Texas in early September. As I rode north the clouds became pretty ominous. And then it started to get really windy. Next, it started raining big stinging rain drops, that might have been small pieces of hail. I had to pull over and seek cover next to a large stone sign for a few minutes until it slowed down enough to ride again.

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Very ominous looking sky

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Can you see the rainbow? It’s pretty light.

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Lots of greenery everywhere

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Small town church

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Cows walking through a field

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Big playground in north Austin

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View from Southwest Parkway

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BBQ ahead, in the little trailer you can hardly see by the red building

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Cool driveway entrance

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After arriving Jester King, I got to enjoy the newest release of La Vie en Rose. It was quite good.

On Sunday I rode some very familiar roads and therefore didn’t end up with many photos.

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You can kinda see the light purple wildflowers along the roadside

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Lots of hay bales

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Yellow AND purple wildflowers

 

Bike training May 30 – 31: 2015 Atlas Ride!

For the fifth year in a row, I rode the Atlas ride, the kickoff ride for the Texas 4000. The Texas 4000 is a 70 day bike ride from Austin to Anchorage undertaken by approximately 70 UT students. Texas 4000 cultivates student leaders and engages communities in the fight against cancer. They share hope, knowledge and charity in the fight against cancer through their  4,000+ mile bike ride from Austin to Anchorage. The students can take one of three routes: Ozarks, Sierra, or Rockies.

This year, the ride was part of my training plan for the Rock’N Hot Bike MS Ride I plan to undertake in September. I like this ride because it goes from Austin north (often with a tailwind) to Lampasas and ends at a winery.

At the start of the ride, this year’s Texas 4000 riders line up in front of the group with alumni from previous years behind them.

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Starting line

it was a beautiful day for a ride. It started out cloudy with some chance of rain but that quickly transitioned to sunny skies. The temperature was pleasant and while the winds were slightly out of the north, they were light. For the first 18 miles I was in a pace group averaging 19 mpg. Shortly after one of the riders behind me crashed, I decided to hang back and let them lose me so I could ride by myself. Well, that and the crazy pace they were taking up the hills was a bit too much after a while.

White yuccas along the side of the road

White yuccas along the side of the road

Blue skies

Blue skies with some dark clouds along the horizon that sort of resembled a mountain range in the distance.

New bridge on the left, old bridge on the right

New bridge on the left, old bridge on the right

Toppa Joppa Too Ranch

Toppa Joppa Too Ranch

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Lots of white yuccas along a small road

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Big sky country

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Coming into Burnet, little church

Old shack on a private ranch road we got to ride on

Old shack on a private ranch road 

Private ranch road

Private ranch road

Horse and a fuzzy donkey

Horse and a fuzzy donkey

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More ranch road. This was the best part of the ride. No traffic. Hardly even other cyclists. Beautiful views and perfect weather.

The ride end was moved this year from the Texas Legato Winery to a park in Lampasas due to the heavy rains we’ve been receiving. The last mile of this ride is always the hardest, no matter the distance. People can sponsor signs of their friends and family that have or had cancer. I try to read each sign and it always makes me tear up. It really underscores the great fundraising work these UT students are doing on their ride to Alaska.

In Lampasas

In Lampasas, one of the in memory / in honor signs

Little cheering squad at the finish

Little cheering squad at the finish

I rode 68 miles in this year’s Atlas ride.

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This year’s ending was at a fun little sculpture park

On Sunday, I rode out Parmer Lane for a 34 miles total. Not much new to see, but Brushy Creek Park was definitely flooded!

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Brushy creek, east side of Parmer

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West side of Parmer

 

2014 Bike MS: Sam’s Club Round Up Ride Recap

Wow! What a fundraising year! As of publishing, my awesome friends and family helped me raise $2,285 for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society Texas Chapter, Bike MS Sam’s Club Round Up Ride! A HUGE thank you to all of my donors! This is a new record for me, and it helped me blow by the $10,000 mark for lifetime donations to Bike MS events. It’s amazing how thinking about all of these donations helped me persevere through some difficult parts of the ride. I expect a few matching donations, including a sizable one from my employer, to roll in over the next few months, so my final donation total is still TBD. Of course, it’s not too late to donate if you’d like to get in on the action!

I couldn’t have asked for better weather over the weekend. I think this was definitely the best Bike MS ride I’ve had, weather wise. My husband and I left Austin Friday afternoon and headed up to Plano, north of Dallas for packet pickup. Of course we had plenty of traffic to deal with in Dallas, since it was near rush hour. We made it and picked up my packet next to a little pond in an outdoor shopping mall.

The next morning I woke up around 6 am, had breakfast and walked outside the hotel and rode to the start line, about a mile away. I waited at the first corner of the route for the lead riders to come out so I could jump in.

GoPro selfie at the Saturday start (notice my top fundraiser jersey from last year’s Bike MS: Ride the Rim!):

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The first 20 miles or so was us riding along a very ugly frontage road, straight north. Because I was up near the front, I was able to hook onto a pace group for a number of those miles and kept a very high average speed. You can see the group plus the lead truck way up in the front of the riders.

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I was unimpressed with how surprised they were that I was keeping up with them. I promised I’d never be able to keep up with a lead group in Austin. I eventually dropped off, knowing that if I kept going so fast I would miss my cheering crew at the rest stop at mile 40.

One of the first interesting sights, a decorative tractor, a water tower and the large sign for “Light Farms” – it was a fancy housing development out in the sticks.

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Me and my shadow on the long ride north. I was all alone for quite a while after I dropped off the pace group.

 

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See? No riders around. So flat and very little wind at this point. It was fast and awesome.

 

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An early rest stop. It was quite small compared to some of the later ones.

 

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I saw so many ranches and farms!

 

 

 

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See? The Malone ranch, named after some of my husband’s family, I figure.

 

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With all those ranches, so many horses!

 

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Small town Texas, and some cyclists.

 

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The number 3 on this guy’s back indicates that he was the #3 top fundraiser! How awesome is that?!?

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Speaking of top fundraisers, these signs were spaced sporadically throughout the route – one sign for each of the top 100 fundraisers!

 

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I stopped for the first time at mile 40. I made it there in just over 2 hours! At mile 40, my husband and his parents were waiting to greet me and one of our friends from the area stopped by to say hi. It was so nice to see everyone!

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After seeing my supporters at the mile 40 rest stop, I rode by Lake Ray Roberts.

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Another shot of the lake:

 

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A country church hosting a rest stop:

 

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Around mile 60 or so the route split. I choose the century route of course. Although, this century was almost 106 miles instead of just 100!

 

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This woman was growing irises. Lots of them. And they are for sale. When I was in high school, I had a flower garden in the backyard (thank you mom and dad!) and I grew some iris bulbs along with gladiolas.

 

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At the mile 70 (ish) rest stop, my husband and mother-in-law were hanging out to see me. Carl took this picture of a group going by:

 

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Here I am approaching the mile 70 (ish) rest stop:

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Jeannie and I at the rest stop, where I managed to try to eat an orange slice and splattered myself with the juice. They were not easy to eat oranges.

 

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And away I go!

 

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So the next exciting thing that happened to me was the rest stop at mile 90. It was sponsored by Cheetos and featured Chester! We got a picture together:

 

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After I was done resting, I got to follow the orange cat prints out of the rest stop:

 

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An old rusty tractor lawn ornament. For my father-in-law:

 

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Encouragement from the local Sonic as we got close to the finish line. I found it very sweet.

 

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A road sign letting drivers know what was going on:

 

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I road in a weird little pack making my way towards the finish. It was a bit like playing leap frog. However, eventually I made the turn onto the grounds of the Texas Motor Speedway. Have I mentioned that I’ve never been there before? Warning: it’s HUGE!

 

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I think I rode like 4 miles just to get around that thing. I was definitely ready to be done at this point!

 

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I agree, SAG 8 is GR8T! For the uninitiated, SAG stands for support and gear. That’s what we call the vehicles involved in supported rides. They usually carry supplies to fix a flat and will drive you to the next rest stop if you need it. Some year, I’d like to do SAG for a ride. You know, once I don’t ride as far. The best SAG driver I saw was a little gray haired lady who leap-frogged me a bunch of times around mile 30 – 50. Have I mentioned how awesome the volunteers are on these rides??

 

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So happy to see the finish…

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A picture from my support crew at the finish:

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Oh hey, I took a photo of them too (I’m holding my GoPro):

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Me and the family, at the finish of day one! Got my medal on and everything!

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Saturday was a great day for riding. Probably one of the best Bike MS days I’ve ever had. The wind was minimal and it was a comfortable temperature and I finished in record time. The only downside was the many bumpy roads I had to ride on. If you’d like, you can check out my garmin results – 105.6 miles at 18.3 mph average!

 

 

 

Ok, now let’s talk about day 2! It started and ended at the Texas Motor Speedway. Carl and I stayed in a hotel about 9 miles away so he had to drive me to the start. He even got out of the car and walked around with me while I tried to figure out where the heck they put the start line. I turns out it was way down the road at one of the gates into the track since we had the option to ride on the Texas Motor Speedway before heading out for the day. Of course I took that option. We were supposed to be let on at 6:45 am, but unfortunately we were not let on until 7 am. In my selfie by the gate, you can see that I’m wearing my 2012 Bike MS jersey from the Ohio Pedal to the Point. Sunday was warmer than Saturday so I didn’t require the extra layer that I wore Saturday and then gave to Carl at mile 40.

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I’ve ridden the F1 track in Austin, and it’s a 3 mile course with many twists and turns and even a hill. By contrast, the Texas Motor Speedway is an oval track with EXTREMELY banked curves, to the point I don’t think you can walk up them. The straight away:

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A little bit of bank:

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Because they started us late, it took a bit of hard riding to get around all of the slower riders. Eventually I made it out on some nice country roads:

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I saw some ponies and what looked like miniature donkeys. Do those things even exist??

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Some fans along the side of the road:

 

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Yellow wildflowers and a cool looking tree:

 

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A field of purple wildflowers behind the fence, to prove that north Texas had wildflowers. Kinda.

 

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A large ranch with lots of fences. Do you spy the horse that came to check us out as we rode by?

 

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A random chimney, all that was left of a house. It strangely had other houses around it.

 

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Sunday was windier than Saturday. I found this rest stop after riding south through some  headwinds for a while. They were very spirited. The kids immediately offered to hold my bike.

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A nice young man poured me some home-made punch at this tiki bar. You can see one of the radio operator stations that helped coordinate the entire rides right next to the tiki bar.

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One of the most common wildflowers that I saw were pink winecups. However, central Texas has way more wildflowers than north Texas.

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On both the out and back sections of this ride, we rode on one of the bumpiest roads I ever met. I thought my toes might fall off. I did see this old falling down barn though.

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For a few miles before the last rest stop on Sunday’s ride, Bucko’s bike shop put up signs. I think this one was my favorite! It kept my mind off the insanely painfully bumpy road. I don’t have a photo of the rest stop, but my husband surprised me by meeting me there, which we hadn’t planned.

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Eventually we had smooth roads, basically for the last 10 miles to the speedway. I don’t think you can understand how happy this made me.

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Passed a little “airport community” with a strip of big houses (not shown) that had their own little private planes.

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The trailer coming towards me had a horse head sticking out of it. Can you see it?

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Me and the motor speedway. A selfie.

 

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Sunday’s finish. I was one happy lady.

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A picture from my entourage:

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Ah, I finished! And Carl met me there. I don’t know if you can tell, but he definitely qualifies for best husband ever.

 

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Along with him, my mother-in-law and Carl’s aunt met me as well! It was such a great day!

 

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Despite being much windier, and some of the bumpiest roads I’ve ever met, I still finished the ride with an average that I was very happy about! 67.8 miles with a 16.7 mph average! I’ll take that any day!

To end this post, I just want to say thank you to each and every one of my donors. And an extra special thank you to those who saw me on the course over Saturday and Sunday. Also, my husband is the best ever. Carl, I hope you never change.

 

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Bike MS training update April 20 – 21, 2013

As I mentioned last week, I’ve started training for Bike MS: Ride the Rim. This is my sixth year participating in a Bike MS, and the first time I’ve done a ride in Texas that’s not the BP MS150. I’m very excited for this ride, it starts in Canyon and loops around the Palo Duro Canyon, the second largest canyon in the US. I’ve always wanted to see it. If you’re able, please consider making a donation to the MS Society in support of my participation.

This past Sunday I rode in the Austin Autism Awareness ride up in Georgetown, Texas. The first half of the ride was quite dreary and colder than I planned for. The wind picked up pretty quickly and the roads were very bumpy in places. After my GoPro camera mount broke the previous weekend, I tried out a new mount so I got plenty of pictures again. Unfortunately the mount wouldn’t stay tight, so I’m again looking for a new option.

While waiting for the start, it sure seemed like the sun was coming out!

While waiting for the start, it sure seemed like the sun was coming out!

On our way out of the park to start the ride.

On our way out of the park to start the ride.

An old hall, basically in the middle of nowhere.

An old hall, basically in the middle of nowhere.

Two riders in matching outfits.

Two riders in matching outfits.

Lots of flatness on the first part of the ride.

Lots of flatness on the first part of the ride.

The clouds kept the temperature down through much of the ride.

The clouds kept the temperature down through much of the ride.

We rode through lots of farm fields.

We rode through lots of farm fields.

Eventually the clouds broke up. There were plenty of wildflowers.

Eventually the clouds broke up. There were plenty of wildflowers.

Can you see the bluebonnets in the field?

Can you see the bluebonnets in the field?

Riding back into the park.

Riding back into the park.

A nice little party set up at the finish line and plenty of spectators to cheer for us at the end!

A nice little party set up at the finish line and plenty of spectators to cheer for us at the end!

Remembering my grandfather

I’ve been quiet on my blog for longer than I’d like because three weeks ago, my grandfather Charles J. Zeidler of Pittsburgh, PA passed away unexpectedly and we traveled to Pittsburgh to be with my family. Today he would have been 83 years old. He was a Korean war vet and up until March 23rd, he was healthy and lived on his own. Since my grandmother died he had established his routine of hanging out at home watching TV, going to the Allegheny Country Rifle Club to have beer and a cigar, and heading to my Aunt and Uncle’s house to have dinner every Friday. In recent years, my grandfather has been a touchpoint for the family, serving as a common connection that we could all come back to. During his memorial service I was impressed by the sheer number of the friends my grandfather had established this late in life. I’m thankful for their support and that of all of my immediate and extended family. I’m glad that so many knew and loved him the way that I did.

To celebrate his birthday, I’d like to share the eulogy I gave at his memorial service just after the taps finished playing.

Thanks for joining us today in celebration of my grandfather’s life. My PapPap was a quiet and friendly man, quick to smile, liked by everyone. I’d like to share with you a few of my memories of him.

I remember staying at Grandma and PapPap’s house, often with my cousins, and asking Grandma repeatedly what time PapPap would be home from work at the steel mill.

I remember walking with him to the top of the hill to play at rosecliff park.

I remember riding with PapPap to take Grandma to and from work at Eat’n Park, with his shouted reminder not to slam the car doors no matter how softly I closed them.

I remember how all of my cousins and I liked to sit on his lap, he had a very comfortable lap.

I remember watching Price is Right with him. I never got the prices right, and he always did.

I remember him visiting us in Ohio for important events like kids softball games and our birthdays, always with a few dozen Dunkin Donuts in tow.

I remember how he made the trip to see the actual important events in my life: my high school graduation, my college graduation from Miami University.

I remember how he took his second plane trip ever to see me get married in Austin, Texas in 2007. I will be forever thankful that I had my two grandparents there. His only previous flight had been during the Korean war.

I remember how he started to talk more as my Grandma got sick.

I remember how he always made the effort to see me, even on my short trips home from Texas. I remember how he visited me in Edinborough during my overnight stop on a two day BikeMS event in 2011. I didn’t know he was coming and I ran into him at a corner gas station as I was pausing to check directions at the end of my 100 mile ride. Needless to say, I was ecstatic to see him.

My last memory of him is how excited he was when I talked to him after sending him a Yuengling pullover for Christmas just a few months ago.

So in celebration of his life, I ask that you toast him this evening by drinking his favorite beer, Yuengling.

 

Thank you for the memories PapPap. I can only hope to have such an outpouring of support when my time comes.

Charles J. Zeidler Jr. April 16, 1930 – March 23, 2013

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Bike MS training update #7: Wait, how far did I just ride?

Unintentionally, this weekend became my first 100+ mile bike training weekend of the season. Unintentionally because my training plan (and what I planned in my head) had me riding 90 – 95 miles this weekend. Instead, I finished at 106 miles.

Now, if you’re asking yourself why I would subject myself to riding more than 100 miles in the hottest Texas weekend so far this year, the answer is that I’m training for Bike MS: Pedal to the Point in August. For the past 5 years I’ve ridden in one of these events to raise funds for the Multiple Sclerosis Society because the disease has affected a number of people in my life throughout the years. Each year it seems I learn of another friend or family member touched by the disease. I hope that researchers can find a cure for MS. I’ve kicked off my fundraising, as I do every year, by personally donating to the MS Society. If you are able, please also consider making a donation to the society. They use the money to provide programs and services to people living with MS as well to fund cutting-edge research.

So, back to my weekend training shenanigans. On Saturday morning, at 6:40 am (!!) I set out on my bike. I left as early as I could drag myself out of bed because I knew it would be hot hot hot. At 6:40, it was amazingly pleasant outside. In fact, the ride overall on Saturday wasn’t nearly as hot as I expected. I started north on Parmer Lane with the intention of doing a “Dam Loop”, a route that is damn hilly and passes the Mansfield Dam out by Lake Travis. This past week my hamstring has been bothering me and after about 10 miles out Parmer, I decided not to make the turn out towards the dam.  Instead, I decided to ride out to Andice, TX which involves hills, but less of them. To get to Andice, you have to ride to the end of Parmer Lane and then make a turn on to ranch road 2338.

Good morning, sun!

A stream seen from a bridge

On my way to the end of Parmer, I made friends with a nice gentleman and we chatted about different bike rides we done. He is training for the Hotter ‘n Hell 100 which lives up to its name from what I hear.  We split ways at the end of Parmer Lane when I turned out towards Andice. At that point, my odometer read 30 miles, I knew I needed water, and was pretty sure Andice wasn’t too far down the road where I could replenish at the general store. Sigh. Andice was more than 5 miles away.

The Andice General Store in my sight!

And more importantly, it was CLOSED. Austin cyclists: the Andice General Store opens at 8 am M – F and 10 am on the weekend. I was there at 9 am. Right after I pulled up, a large group of cyclists from the team in training showed up, also mightily disappointed. Luckily, someone found a spicket on the back of the building that I reluctantly used to fill my bottle. There really isn’t any other water source for many many miles.

Oh Andice General Store, how you have forsaken me.

Instead of turning around and going back directly the way that I came, I knew that there were back roads that would get me back to Parmer Lane. They were quite pleasant to ride on with almost no traffic and lots of shade.

A nice smooth, shady road.

One of the best parts of riding on Saturday was the very minimal wind I encountered. Even when the headwind started to pick up on my way back, it was still minimal and actually necessary to keep me cool-ish. It was just a great morning for riding in Austin. I ended up riding 69 miles for the day, a bit longer than I expected.

Someone turned off the wind!

Later that afternoon we went to the packet pickup for the Urban Assault Ride put on by New Belgium Brewing and stopped for a delicious treat at Bananarchy. Chocolate covered frozen bananas with toppings? Yes, please!

A well deserved amazingly delicious treat

And that brings me to Sunday’s ride. My husband and I participated in the Austin Urban Assault Ride. Last year’s Urban Assault Ride was about 18 miles when we finished. In order to get extra miles in, I rode the 13 miles to the start line at Fiesta Garden Park. To do this, I left at 6:20 am. It was noticeably hotter and more humid than Saturday despite the sun not even being up yet.

The ride is a lot of fun. You have to ride to different checkpoints and perform obstacles in order to collect a bead that proved that you completed that obstacle. You also have to figure out the location of two mystery checkpoints. The obstacles included fun things like riding a bike while catching loops with a foam sword, jumping into a pool and collecting rubber duckies, riding an adult big wheel, and sitting on a skateboard and being towed by a bike. The husband and I were able to easily figure out mystery point 1, where we got the clue for mystery point 2. I thought I knew the second mystery point but was wrong, leading us to check a few locations before figuring it out. Also, we somehow skipped a checkpoint on our ride and had to back track to avoid a huge penalty. Because of our failures, I ended up riding 37 miles for the day, also longer than I had planned. Oh well, we did have beer at the finish line. Next year we hope our friends / partners in crime for the UAR will be riding with us again.

Everyone lined up and ready to race!

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